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Will This Be The End Of College Football? It Should Be. – Forbes

Steve Smith of the New York Giants is tackled by Brandon Meriweather of the New England Patriots during Super Bowl 42 on Feb. 3, 2008. The Giants beat the Patriots 17-14 that day. Photographer: Tom Hauck/Bloomberg News

Parents send their kids off to college with high hopes and great expectations. Universities, in turn, have a responsibility to provide an education in an environment that supports and also challenges the students.

Universities are not supposed to encourage activities that may result in permanent brain damage.

And yet, they do. As revealed in a new report by Jesse Mez and colleagues from Boston University, just published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, a shockingly high number of former football players, from both college and professional teams, suffered chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) later in life, likely as a result of their years playing football.

The study authors looked at 202 deceased former football players whose brains had been donated for research, and found that 87% of them had some degree of CTE. The highest rates of CTE were among former NFL players, which affected 110 out of 111 players. CTE was nearly as bad in college football players, though, with 91% of them (48 out of 53) suffering from CTE.

Over half of the high school players (27) had “severe pathology.” The authors noted that in deceased players with severe CTE, the most common cause of death was neurodegenerative disease. As they also explain:

“There is substantial evidence that CTE is a progressive, neurodegenerative disease.”

In other words, CTE is a death sentence.

The authors of the study stated their conclusions carefully, noting that the study was not randomized, and that players and their families may have been motivated to participate because they were concerned about a possible link between football and CTE. Nonetheless, even if the risk of CTE is much lower than found in this study, universities should be taking a very hard look at the risks that they are exposing their students to.

Or to put it another way, is it okay to ask young men to play football if the risk of permanent brain damage is only 50%? What if it’s just 10 or 20%? Is that okay? Is football that important?

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